Is E-mail Address Case-sensitive? What is CC and BCC? What is E-mail Spam? Phishing Attacks?

We Know That Most Of You Guys, Must Be Knowing Most Of Things Mentioned in this post, But It’s For Those Who Actually Don’t Know, Or Want To Know More! So, Feel Free Guys!

Are email addresses case sensitive?

The domain name part of an email address is case insensitive (i.e. case does not matter). The local mailbox part, however, is case sensitive. The email address ReCipiENt@eXaMPle.cOm is indeed different from recipient@example.com (but it the same as ReCipiENt@example.com).

Are Google email addresses case sensitive?

Most SMTP servers are fine with uppercase characters. However, some do differentiate between upper and lower case characters in the recipient part. The domain part is case insensitive. For example, google mail does not differentiate between upper and lower case recipients.

Are Hotmail email addresses case sensitive?

The domain name part of an email address is case insensitive (i.e. case does not matter). The local mailbox part, however, is case sensitive. The email address ReCipiENt@eXaMPle.cOm is indeed different from recipient@example.com (but it the same as ReCipiENt@example.com).

What is the difference in CC and BCC in an email?

Image result for what is cc and bcc

Anyone you add to the cc: field of a message receives a copy of that message when you send it. All other recipients of that message can see that person you designated as a cc: recipient. To add an entry in the cc: field, click the Add cc: link under the To: field. Bcc: stands for “blind carbon copy.”

E-mail Signature:

Image result for email signature

An e-mail signature is a block of text that is appended to the end of an e-mail message you send. Generally, a signature is used to provide the recipient with your name, e-mail address, business contact information, or Web site URL.

E-mail Spamming:

Image result for what is email spamming

Email spam, also known as junk email, is a type of electronic spam where unsolicited messages are sent by email. Many email spam messages are commercial in nature but may also contain disguised links that appear to be for familiar websites but in fact lead to phishing web sites or sites that are hosting malware.

Is spamming illegal?

I’m not arguing that sending unsolicited bulk email is anything other than bad. And that a lot of senders have a negative reaction to being called spammers. I’ve even had hate mail for saying that an ISP was blocking mail because recipients were saying the mail was spam. In the US, though, spam is not illegal.

Phishing:

Image result for phishing attack

Phishing attacks use email or malicious websites (clicking on a link) to collect personal and financial information or infect your machine with malware and viruses.

Spear Phishing:

Spear phishing is highly specialized attacks against a specific target or small group of targets to collect information or gain access to systems.

For example, a cyber criminal may launch a spear phishing attack against a business to gain credentials to access a list of customers. From that attack, they may launch a phishing attack against the customers of the business. Since they have gained access to the network, the email they send may look even more authentic and because the recipient is already customer of the business, the email may more easily make it through filters and the recipient maybe more likely to open the email.

How Do You Avoid Being a Victim?

  • Don’t reveal personal or financial information in an email, and do not respond to email solicitations for this information. This includes following links sent in email.

  • Before sending sensitive information over the Internet, check the security of the website.

  • Pay attention to the website’s URL. Malicious websites may look identical to a legitimate site, but the URL may use a variation in spelling or a different domain (e.g., .com versus .net).

  • If you are unsure whether an email request is legitimate, try to verify it by contacting the company directly. Contact the company using information provided on an account statement, not information provided in an email. Information about known phishing attacks is available online from groups such as the Anti-Phishing Working Group. Report phishing to the Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG)

  • Keep a clean machine. Having the latest operating system, software, web browsers, anti-virus protection and apps are the best defenses against viruses, malware, and other online threats.

What Should You Do if You Think You are a Victim?

  • Report it to the appropriate people within the organization, including network administrators. They can be alert for any suspicious or unusual activity.

  • If you believe your financial accounts may be compromised, contact your financial institution immediately and close the account(s).

  • Watch for any unauthorized charges to your account.

  • Consider reporting the attack to your local police department, and file a report with the Federal Trade Commission or the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center.

Protect Yourself with these Think Before You Click!. Tips:

  • When in doubt, throw it out: Links in email, tweets, posts and online advertising are often how cybercriminals try to compromise your information. If it looks suspicious, even if you know the source, it’s best to delete or, if appropriate, mark it as junk.

  • Think before you act: Be wary of communications that implores you to act immediately, offers something that sounds too good to be true or asks for personal information.

  • Make your password a sentence: A strong password is a sentence that is at least 12 characters long. Focus on positive sentences or phrases that you like to think about and are easy to remember (for example, “I love country music.”). On many sites, you can even use spaces!

  • Unique account, unique password:  Having separate passwords for every account helps to thwart cybercriminals. At a minimum, separate your work and personal accounts and make sure that your critical accounts have the strongest passwords.

  • Lock down your login: Fortify your online accounts by enabling the strongest authentication tools available, such as biometrics, security keys or a unique one-time code through an app on your mobile device. Your usernames and passwords are not enough to protect key accounts like email, banking and social media.

Hope This Helps!

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 Information Brought To You By Biovolt Corporation.

 

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