Google Will Soon Shame All Websites That Are Unencrypted! Do You Have SSL?

First Things First! What is SSL? Why Do We I Need SSL?, Well Wonder No More!

What is SSL?

SSL (Secure Socket Layer) is the standard security technology for establishing an encrypted link between a web server and a browser. This secure link ensures that all data transferred remains private. It’s also called TLS (Transport Layer Security). Millions of websites use SSL encryption everyday to secure connections and keep their customer’s data safe from monitoring and tampering.

Why Use SSL?

Every website on the Internet should be served over HTTPS. Here’s why:

  • Performance: Modern SSL can actually improve page load times.

  • Search Ranking Boost: Search engines favor HTTPS websites.

  • Security: Encrypting traffic with SSL ensures nobody can snoop on your users’ data.

  • Trust: By displaying a green lock in the browser’s address bar, SSL increases visitor’s trust.

  • Regulatory Compliance: SSL is a key component in PCI compliance.

Google wants to kill the unencrypted internet, and will soon flag two thirds of the web as “unsafe.”

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Google wants everything on the web to be travelling over a secure channel. That’s why in the future your Chrome browser will flag unencrypted websites as insecure, displaying a red “x” over a padlock in the URL bar.

With this upcoming change in Chrome, Google makes it clear that the web of the future should all be encrypted, and all sites should be served over HTTPS, which is essentially a secure layer on top of the usual HTTP web protocol. Several companies and organizations have been pushing for more encrypted sites as part of a campaign to “Encrypt All The Things,” which consists of promoting more websites to abandon the traditional, less secure HTTP protocol and adopt HTTPS.

Currently, Chrome displays only an icon of a white page when the website you’re accessing is not secured with HTTPS, a green locked padlock when it is, as well as a padlock with a red “x” on it when there’s something wrong with the HTTPS page the user is trying to access. The change will draw even more attention to the sites that are potentially insecure.

 

“The goal of this proposal is to more clearly display to users that HTTP provides no data security.”

The internet giant quietly announced this plan back in 2014, when one of the members of the Chrome Security Team sent out a proposal to mark all HTTP websites as “non-secure.”

“The goal of this proposal is to more clearly display to users that HTTP provides no data security,” Google’s Chris Palmer wrote.

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On Tuesday, during a presentation at the Usenix Enigma security conference in San Francisco, an engineer at security firm CloudFlare showed how this looks like today when the user enables a special feature in Chrome’s settings, and presumably how it might look like in the future if it’s enabled by default. (You can see the little red “x” on the padlock in the URL bar.)

Parisa Tabriz, who manages Google’s security engineering team, tweeted that Google’s intention is to “call out” HTTP for what it is: “UNSAFE.”

The rationale is that on every website served over HTTP the data exchanged between the site’s server and the user is in the clear, meaning anyone with the ability to snoop on the connection, be it a hacker at a coffee shop or a repressive government, could steal passwords, private messages, or other sensitive information.

Over the past few months we’ve been running tests taking into account whether sites use secure, encrypted connections as a signal in our search ranking algorithms. We’ve seen positive results, so we’re starting to use HTTPS as a ranking signal. For now it’s only a very lightweight signal—affecting fewer than 1 per cent of global queries, and carrying less weight than other signals such as high-quality content — while we give webmasters time to switch to HTTPS. But over time, we may decide to strengthen it, because we’d like to encourage all website owners to switch from HTTP to HTTPS to keep everyone safe on the web. –Google Officials Said.

But HTTPS doesn’t just protect user data, it also ensures that the user is really connecting to the right site and not an imposter one. This is important because setting up a fake version of a website users normally trust is a favorite tactic of hackers and malicious actors. HTTPS also ensures that a malicious third party can’t hijack the connection and insert malware or censor information.

If your website is already serving on HTTPS, you can test its security level and configuration with the Qualys Lab tool. If you are concerned about TLS and your site’s performance, have a look at Is TLS fast yet?.

We Know In 2017,  Still SSL Certificates are expensive That’s Why We’ve Have Found Some FREE SSL Providers For You Guys!

Image result for startssl

StartSSL: One Of Free SSL Providers!

https://www.startssl.com

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Let’s Encrypt: One Of Free SSL Providers!

https://letsencrypt.org

We hope to see more websites using HTTPS in the future. Let’s all make the web more secure!

We Know This post Is late, But As an Old Age Saying Better Late Than Never.

Hope This Helps!

Please…  Like … Share… Comment… Follow…

 Information Brought To You By Biovolt Corporation.

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